Prototype tests of the Electromagnetic Particle Injector-2 for Fast Time Response Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks

Raman, Roger ; Lunsford, Robert ; Clauser, C. F. ; Jardin, S. C. ; Menard, J. E. ; Ono, M.
Issue date: 2021
Rights:
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY)
Cite as:
Raman, Roger, Lunsford, Robert, Clauser, C. F., Jardin, S. C., Menard, J. E., & Ono, M. (2021). Prototype tests of the Electromagnetic Particle Injector-2 for Fast Time Response Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks [Data set]. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University. https://doi.org/10.11578/1888262
@electronic{raman_roger_2021,
  author      = {Raman, Roger and
                Lunsford, Robert and
                Clauser, C. F. and
                Jardin, S. C. and
                Menard, J. E. and
                Ono, M.},
  title       = {{Prototype tests of the Electromagnetic P
                article Injector-2 for Fast Time Respons
                e Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks}},
  publisher   = {{Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Pri
                nceton University}},
  year        = 2021,
  url         = {https://doi.org/10.11578/1888262}
}
Description:

Predicting and controlling disruptions is an important and urgent issue for ITER. Some disruptions with a short warning time may be unavoidable. For these cases, a fast time response disruption mitigation method is essential. Experimental tests on a prototype system of a novel, rapid time-response disruption mitigation system being developed for tokamak-based reactors and as a backup option for ITER, referred to as the electromagnetic particle injector (EPI), have been able to verify the primary advantages of the concept. These are its ability to meet short warning time scales of <10 ms while attaining the projected high velocities for deep radiative payload penetration in reactor-scale plasmas. The EPI relies on an electromagnetic propulsion system. A metallic sabot is accelerated electromagnetically to the required velocities (>1 km/s) within 2 ms, at which point it releases a radiative payload consisting of a shell pellet or well-defined microspheres. Initial experimental tests from the prototype system show attainment of over 600 m/s in about 1 ms. Essential aspects of payload separation from the sabot and sabot capture have also been demonstrated at 200 m/s, and the method can be extended to over 2 km/s.

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